Digilogue, digital natives, and the future of retail (PT1)

Posted on Monday, 15 Jun 2015

In mid-April this year I was a futurist speaker at RetailDetail's congress in Antwerpen, Belgium. 
After the congress I was interviewed about my book Digilouge, digital natives and my perspective on the future of retail. Before you read part 1 (out of two) of this interview  please take a look at my Future Trendspots video where I talk about what the future of retail will look like. 

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Tags: Change Management, Disruptive Trends, Future Trends

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